NEW YORK
     Nov. 6, 2018 Governor

Gov.
Sen.3
Sen.1
2018


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+Andrew Cuomo/Kathy Hochul
(D, WOR, IND, WEP)

3,635,340
59.62%
Marc Molinaro/Julie Killian (R, CON, REF)
2,207,602
36.21%
Howie Hawkins/Jia Lee (G)
103,946
1.70%
Larry Sharpe/Andrew Hollister (L)
95,033
1.56%
Stephanie Miner/Michael Volpe (SAM)
55,441
0.91%

6,097,362

Also: 122,040 blank votes, 4,442 void, and 7,115 scattering.
Plurality 1,427,738 votes (23.41 percentage points).
  New York State Board of Elections



Notes:  Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) won a third term, defeating Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro (R) as well as Howie Hawkins (G), Larry Sharpe (L) and Stephanie Miner (SAM).  Molinaro previously served in the New York Assembly and the Dutchess County Legislature, and was first elected to office, the Village of Tivoli Board of Trustees, in 1994 at the age of 18.  This was Hawkins' third run for governor; he also ran in 2010 and 2014, and has made numerous other runs for public office.  The Libertarian nominee, Larry Sharpe, works as a trainer and an advisor.  Miner, a former mayor of Syracuse, announced her run as an independent ("Serve America Movement") on June 18, 2018.

In the Sept. 13 Democratic primary Cuomo faced a challenge from actress Cynthia Nixon.  Nixon, running as a progressive, attracted national attention including the endorsement of The Nation magazine (July 2-9, 2018 issue).  There was one primary debate, on Aug. 29 (+), marked by sharp exchanges.  During the debate, Cuomo ruled out a 2020 presidential run (he was appearing on many/most lists of possible candidates). 
Asked by the moderator if he would promise to serve his four-year term, Cuomo said he would.  "The only caveat is if God strikes me dead. Otherwise, I will serve four more years as Governor." 
Cuomo went on to win 65.5% of the vote in the primary.  Molinaro was uncontested for the Republican nomination

The Sept. 13 primary, makes for a very short general election campaign.  There was one debate between Cuomo and Molinaro hosted by CBS2 on Oct. 23 (+).


Cuomo enjoyed a huge financial advantage; according to the National Institute for Money in Politics, his campaign received contribution totalling $37.0 million compared to $2.4 million for Molinaro, $795,261 for Miner, $520,318 for Sharpe and $80,200 for Hawkins (+).


Campaign Managers:
Andrew Cuomo:  Maggie Moran
(reported July 8, 2018)  BlueStrat. New Jersey state director for Gore-Lieberman.  State director for Sen. Frank Lautenberg from 1998 to July 2000.  Political director for the NJ Dem. State Committee during 1997-98.  Director of rapid response/operations for the 1996 Democratic coordinated campaign.


Marc Molinaro:  Lynn Krogh
(announced June 13, 2018)  Consultant with Casale Group; work has included Wendy Long's 2012 campaign for U.S. Senate.  National political director of movement to draft Donald Trump for President, 2011.  State political director on Rick Lazio's 2010 campaign for governor to Sept. 2010, then worked on Carl Paladino's campaign for governor for the close.  Co-founder of Gotham Management Group, a consulting firm, Sept. 2009-May 2011.  Elected chair of New York State Young Republicans in 2009.  Director of public relations at Studio Daniel Libeskind, 2007-09.  Deputy press secretary and earlier press assistant to Gov. George E. Pataki.  Assistant on Pataki's 2002 re-election camapign.  Studied at University of Albany SUNY and Hunter College.  Troy native; worked on her father's campaigns for City Council.




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