Nov. 6, 2018 Senate Races

Gov.
Sen.
2018
x
2017
1, 2 x
2016
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x
2015


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At Stake: 35 Seats
Before Nov. 6: 51R, 47D and 2I.

AZ - CA - CT - DE - FL - HI - IN - ME - MD - MA - MI - MN (f) - MN (s) - MS (f) - MS (s) - MO - MT - NE - NV - NJ - NM - NY - ND - OH - PA - RI - TN - TX - UT - VT - VA - WA - WV - WI - WY



Democrats Republicans Third Party/Independent
Arizona

D





California



no Republican candidate
no other candidates




Connecticut





Delaware

missing





Florida

R





Hawaii
missing
no literature





Indiana





Maine




Maryland




Massachusetts





Michigan
missing





Minnesota

 





Minnesota




Mississippi





Mississippi




Missouri

R




Montana





Nebraska





Nevada

D





New Jersey






New Mexico




New York
no literature





North Dakota

R





Ohio





Pennsylvania





Rhode Island





Tennessee





Texas




Utah





Vermont
no Democratic candidate missing

+




Virginia




Washington
no literature




West Virginia





Wisconsin





Wyoming

Thank you to the many people who have helped make this page possible.

After Nov. 27: 52R, 46D and 2I.
  Margin of Victory in Percentage Points
25.01 +
20.01-25.0
15.01-20.0
10.01-15.0
5.01-10.0
0-5.0
0-5.0
5.01-10.0
10.01-15.0
15.01-20.0
20.01-25.0
25.01 +
NY 34.00
MD 34.55
HI 42.30
CT 20.18
DE 22.14
RI 23.11
NM 23.56
MNf 24.10
MA 24.17
VA 15.99
WA 16.86
MNs 10.52
WI 10.83
NJ 11.16
PA 12.87
NV 5.03*
MI 6.50
OH 6.62
AZ 1.35*
WV 3.31
MT 3.55
FL 0.12*
TX 2.56
MO 5.81*
IN 5.89*
MSs 7.26
TN 10.79
ND 10.84*
MSf 19.02
NE 19.07

UT 31.68
WY 36.86
   *Seat changed parties. 
    Not shown: CA (two Democrats), ME (Indep. A.King won by 19.09 percentage points) and VT (Indep. B.Sanders won by 39.13 percentage points).

 

Several More Facts & Figs
  • The most expensive race of the cycle was Florida where, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, a total of $204.4 million was spent ($114.3 million by the campaigns and $90.0 million in outside spending), setting a new record for the most expensive Senate race.  All told six races came in at over $100 milllion.  The other $100 million-plus races were Texas at $137.8 million ($124.3 million and $13.5 million), Missouri at $127.0 million ($50.3 million and $76.7 million), Nevada at $106.1 million ($40.2 million and $65.8 million), Arizona at $105.5 million ($44.6 million and $60.9 million), and Indiana at $105.0 million ($35.3 million and $69.7 million). >
  • The closest Senate race of the cycle was in Florida, where Gov. Rick Scott (R) defeated incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson (D) by, after the recount process, 10,033 votes out of 8,190,005 (0.12 percentage points).
  • Of the 69 major party nominees, 23 were women: 15D (11 incumbents and 4 challengers) and 8R (2 incumbents and 6 challengers).  For the Democrats 9 of 11 incumbents and 2 of 4 challengers won; for the Republicans both incumbents won as did 1 of the 6 challengers (plus McSally was later appointed in AZ).
  • Excluding incumbent Sens. Angus King (ME) and Bernie Sanders (VT), the strongest showings by third party or independent candidates were former Gov. Gary Johnson (L) with 15.4% in New Mexico and Rusty Hollen (L) with 4.2% in West Virginia.
  • A total of 61 general election U.S. Senate debates were noted, 47 of which occurred in the month of October.  In most races there were either one (14) or two (14) debates.  Third party and independent candidates had a hard time getting on the stage.  Only ten of the 61 debates had more than two candidates participating.



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